ARTIST FEATURE: Pauline Grazioli

Interview of Pauline Grazioli by Sophie Pellegrini

 

Tell us a bit about yourself!

My name is Pauline (but I named myself Eniluapski for my photography activity), I’m from France, I’m 19 (god damn I always forgot that I grew older a few month ago) and I study the history of art as well as literature, philosophy, and history. I use two cameras, a Canon 6D and a film camera. I like both because they offer so many different possibilities.

Where did the name Eniluapski come from?

Well the name Eniluapski comes from my name written backwards and I added “ski” at the end. In fact, there’s not really a meaning for the name but I found it interesting and relevant. In fact, I really identify with this name. I would not choose another one today if I had to. (And it is really funny to see people having difficulties to pronounce it.)

How and when did you get started in photography?

Well I really started photography about three years ago, when I created my Facebook page and I tried to develop my own style. I took pictures of a lot of stuff before, just for pleasure. I started photography one day when I was desperately bored; I just took my parents’ camera and I went outside to take pictures of everything around me. My very first model was my cat and he’s still my favorite model. I quickly became addicted to photography.

What is your favorite thing to photograph? Why?

Honestly, I don’t really know. I like to take pictures of both nature and humans. Both are very interesting to photograph. I’m tempted to say that humans are more interesting because of the relationship you create with your model, but I really like to take pictures of flowers, because I can play with light and colors more easily. Taking pictures of flowers and nature in general is really soothing to me. It’s like a moment of meditation.

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How do you choose the people you photograph? In other words, what makes you want to photograph a particular person?

Most of the time, I choose my models because I’m inspired by them. I just feel something when I see them. If I don’t feel something in front of them, I can’t take pictures of them. I think it’s important to have a connection with the person you collaborate with. I used to transform people into fragile things, but in fact most of my models are strong people. That’s really impressive. I try not to make them appear too fragile but I like this aspect of human beings. I usually take pictures of women, and I’m so much more comfortable with it. I’m quite shy. I’d like to photography men more often but I think I need to have a link with them. The only boys I’ve ever photographed are two of my best friends. Strangely for the women I photograph it’s the contrary; I’m more comfortable taking pictures of unknown women and trying to make apparent who they really are, or who they appear to be to me.

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Do you have a favorite image you’ve made or shoot that you’ve done?

This is quite hard to answer! I would say this one. That’s a very recent pictures that I took with a film camera. This is my girlfriend (who is also a photographer) and we had such a good time shooting in a forest near her house. We were expecting a ray of light and we were laughing and taking pictures. I’m also totally fan of the result of this picture, with those lights and colors. This is just one example of our work together but I like it so much.

What inspires your work? Any particular artists, books, films, etc?

Art in general inspires me. Studying history of art helps me a lot to understand how colors work together. I think Xavier Dolan’s filmography helps me a lot to understand want I want to show through my photographs, especially the work of colors and light.

How would you describe your photography aesthetic in a few words?

Flowers, lights, colors, sweetness, stunning and kind human beings.

What’s your favorite personal quality?

I’m not really confident but photography and art in general helped me to feel better with myself. I try day by day to improve myself. In fact, being a photographer helped me so much to be more confident. When you’re alone with your model, there’s no way out, you have to guide her/him, help her/him to understand what you want her/him to do. I meet so many great people in the milieu and they help me every day to be proud of my work.

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Sophie Pellegrini

Sophie Pellegrini is the Co-Founder and Artistic & Creative Director of Ramona Magazine for Girls. She is a 25-year-old photographer and wilderness therapy field guide in Colorado. She loves crafting, playing acoustic guitar, 90s music, the smell of summer, making lists, a good nap, cuddly animals, and the cold side of the pillow. Follow Sophie on her website and on Instagram.

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